Oscar

Status: Recent Adoptions

2-3-years old

Necessities: No or minimal stairs.

No other dogs or cats. Fenced yard.  Oscar will not potty on a leash, so a fenced yard is a must.

“Oscar is a very relaxed and laid-back boy,” says his foster dad. He’s a golden who loves being petted, rarely barks, and enjoys following dad around the house. Stuffed toys are his pals. He can be found resting his head on his favorites and tussling them . . . with minimal stuffing loss! His new “Tuffy stuffie” toy is a hit! With the recent snow melt, Oscar enjoys lying on the grass in the backyard and relaxing in the sunshine.

Though a young golden, Oscar may have had an injury earlier in his life that required hip surgery. He lived in Turkey before coming to the U.S. last year, so the circumstances are unknown. The vet here in the States feels that Oscar likely did not receive follow up physical therapy after the surgery. This is evidenced by Oscar’s difficulty with stairs and frequent limping. If he gets too much activity, he does not want to use his left leg. But, after a bit of rest, he’s quickly using it again. It’s because of this cycle of use the vet feels that scar tissue is the culprit of his discomfort. Currently, foster dad walks Oscar a couple of times each day. Upon returning home, foster dad does some “range-of-motion” stretches for Oscar’s hip. While in the backyard, Oscar has been seen chasing squirrels—even switching directions, but he really shouldn’t go overboard with his activity.

How Oscar would get along with other dogs and cats in the home is an uncertainly at this point, so we are suggesting that having no other animals in Oscar’s forever home would be best. While on walks, Oscar “gets very excited,” when he sees other dogs, according to dad. He whines and pulls to get to them. He’s been observed chasing a dog, yet he’s ignored others. It’s about the same with cats. The person who rescued him in Turkey said, “He loves to play, but all my dogs are seniors and none of them want to play!” Engaging with other people? Foster dad says, “He’s as relaxed as can be.”

Oscar’s new owners should be willing to continue walking him and performing his hip/leg exercises. Attending physical therapy sessions is suggested by the vet and may improve Oscar’s range of motion and muscle mass.  Oscar will need joint supplements and pain medication as needed. Note the vet also stated, “Oscar really is the sweetest dog! Overall, he looks good! No surgery recommended.”

This sweet, beautiful boy is hoping to find his forever home. If you’re looking for a calm friend, Oscar might be the dog for you!